Saturday, October 13, 2007

No Benefit

Today is Smoke-free Day 117.

I went to the girl doctor yesterday, and she is awesome. I wish I could see her more than once a year (well, I mean for other stuff, not that kind of appointment, obviously) because she actually asked questions expecting a full answer and even asked further questions for clarification when I gave only the tiny little 5 word snippets (yes, it's true, I'm capable of that with extreme concentration) I've become used to giving a doctor in hopes that it will make me better heard. My faith that there really are some good doctors out there has been restored, and I'll just have to keep looking for the regular one among my limited primary care doctor choices. I think my doctor was actually a nurse practitioner instead of an actual doctor, so maybe that was part of it, too...

Anyway, that's really not what I intended to say, but it spilled out, and there it is.

What I wanted to say was that when the doctor's assistant was going over my information (after recording the 5-10 pounds I have in fact gained since quitting smoking and advising me that my blood pressure was little high, which is new), she mentioned the Chantix listed in the file and separately noted later that I'm listed as a non-smoker and looked to me for confirmation. Instead of being a normal patient and just nodding my head that this was correct information, I got all giddy and had to tell her that "yes, I am a non-smoker, and, not that you asked the date, but I can tell you that it's been since June 18th!" (This after having no clue about the other "date of your last" they ask at the girl doctor - ladies, you understand) She went on to tell me that this was awesome because there is no benefit to smoking, and then it kills you, and it's expensive, and so forth. My first thought was that she'd never smoked before because of how matter of factly and simply she stated that there was "no benefit" to smoking.

I've thought about it, and she's right. I can't think of one thing that I would exactly call "beneficial" about smoking, especially now that physically my body doesn't "need" it anymore - as Chris reminded me, at this point it really is all in my head.

5 comments:

  1. My son is a doctor, anesthesiologist. He has always been a people person and spends an inordinate amount of time with his patients (much to his wife's chagrin).
    Anyway, you are right on the mark - nothing good can come from being a smoker!

    Congrats on another day Maggie - you are my hero!!!!!!

    ReplyDelete
  2. Yep, NO BENEFIT whatsoever!

    That's the sad, stupid part about smoking...it serves no useful purpose. Just thinking of the years I smoked, the damage I've probably done to my body...it makes me want to cry! The worse part is that I did it to myself! How crazy is that? When I think about it, which I try NOT to because it's negative energy, I get so pissed at myself!! WTF was I thinking?? :-(

    Oh well, the past is the past and we can't change that, so I'll end my post on a positive note:

    I'm living for the NOW, enjoying my smoke-free life, and looking forward to a happy, healthy future!

    Hope everybody's quit is going well!

    ReplyDelete
  3. Congratulations Maggie on being able to call yourself a non-smoker at the doctor's! That's huge! That's has been one of my main motivators. I want to be able to say that I don't smoke the next time that I go to the doctor's.

    I'm glad you found a great doctor. I was lucky myself when I found my family doctor. I've never really had one before because I'm not one to go to the doctors unless I had something seriously wrong. Even though I smoked for 35 years, I was in remarkably good health. I decided that at 51 I probably should have a family doctor for myself and my husband "just in case". I lucked out with a doctor who actually sits down and talks to you. He even looks at you when you're talking and pays attention. I really like him and know that I couldn't have found anyone better.

    I hope that your visit with your friend is great!

    ReplyDelete
  4. Maggie! Ok, so 5-10 lbs snuck up on you. That's cool. When I quit the time before this I ended up like 40-50 lbs heavier and miserable. When I started smoking again I lost it all and thought "Oh man, if I had just stayed smoking I would have been fine the whole time". Except for one small thing...that was BS. After enough time went by I put on the weight again even though I was smoking. Except this time, I couldn't lose it with exercise b/c I was a smoker and could hardly move.

    Since quitting smoking and increasing my running, I feel 100% better, and I am about 20 lbs lighter ;)

    Stay strong girl!

    ReplyDelete

Talk to me.