Monday, February 06, 2012

Refreshing. Beautiful. Healthy. Tea. Happy. Maggie.

Japan has one of my favorite non-alcoholic drinks. It's called 爽健美茶 (sou-ken-bi-cha, with the literal meaning: refreshing healthy beauty tea), and in addition to the catchy little jingle back about 15 years ago (see below) when I was here that I still sing (sometimes out loud. to myself. publicly.) and  having a nice meaning (and a really sexy looking first kanji letter in the name), it's also a delicious blend of some different teas and stuff like herbs and barley (don't get me started on how much I love 麦茶 mugicha - barely tea, for many of the same reasons). Then they mix it and add pure magical goodness or crack. And that jingle. Yay, marketing!

Here's the jingle that stayed with me, even when I forgot all useful Japanese.
It's that very last bit when they say "sou-ken-bi-cha" all sing-songy.

While I'll drink a Coke with my Big Mac, when I am actually thirsty, I just don't really feel inclined to drink something carbonated or sugary and often opt for water. I love water. Seriously. Back home, it's what I drink most because we don't have Soukenbicha. To me, Soukenbicha is kind of like water - clean, clear, refreshing, no calories - but then with a nice mild and not even really "tea-like" flavor. It's good stuff.

I sound like a commercial. They don't know or care who I am, but I am madly in love all that is this amazing drink. I'm not alone. It's even on the menu at McDonald's. Of course, most everyone where I'm from knows that you can't drink water/water-like drinks when trying to wash down your burger and fries because you need that carbonation to make the grease not stick and the calories not count (it's a Maggie Math thing, never mind, carry on), so then it's Coke, all the way. Soukenbicha or water (or mugicha) are for me for all those other times I want to be refreshingly healthy and amazingly beautiful, though.
22/366 - Refreshing. Beautiful. Healthy. Tea. Happy. Maggie.
(taken on my iPhone, toyed with in BeFunkyFx app)

7 comments:

  1. I wonder if that's available in the States?

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    1. I found it in Portland at the huge Japanese grocery store, but it was a little spendy because it was imported. I've read that there are versions made just for the US market, but it sounds like the flavor is different.

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  2. Thast IS a sexy looking kanji letter!!! Does it have an exact meaning?

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    1. Janet, yep, that one means refreshing/clear. So fitting!

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  3. Sounds wonderful. I'm with Lou, I wonder if I could find this at our Asian markets.

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    1. Tara, possibly. I just replied to Lou's comment above. If you can find it, please try it! :)

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  4. I can totally get this at our Asian superstore. I'm going to, then report back to you!

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